We invite you to discover, engage and follow the Northwest Arkansas African American Heritage Association, Washington County Community Remembrance Project, BAD Times forum and Reflections in Black.

No Justice, No Peace Mural

Northwest Arkansas African American Heritage Association

Organized in 2008 by the late Melba Smith a descendant of enslaved people in Washington County, Arkansas and Sharon Killian, a descendant of enslaved people in Jamaica and the Caribbean, the mission of this organization is to document and preserve African American heritage in Northwest Arkansas and to highlight African American participation in the development of this region that began before Arkansas statehood was granted in 1836.

Most recently, the organization collaborated with Art Ventures and the organizers of the Fayetteville in Living Color event to create the No Justice, No Peace mural at the Fayetteville, Arkansas “protest corner” on Dickson and College. The event was created and led by Taliyah Brooks, professional athlete and University of Arkansas instructor, and Markus Ballengee, junior biomedical sciences major and SEC heptathlon Silver medalist, to bring awareness to the Black Lives Matter movement—and raised over $6,000 which was donated to the NWA African American Heritage Association.

The organization has an active Facebook page and regularly shares upcoming events, posts on African American history, and content highlighting the contributions and perspectives of Black people both locally and across the globe. You can visit and follow the Facebook page below.

Visit Facebook Page

Washington County Community Remembrance Project

The Washington County Community Remembrance Project is a program of the Northwest Arkansas African American Heritage Association working in alignment with the principles and guidelines of the Equal Justice Initiative. The project is about involving the African American community and others in establishing a memorial marker for Aaron, Anthony and Randall—three historic victims of racial terror in our area of Washington County.

The marker will be erected in the historic Oaks Cemetery, the first planned cemetery for Black people in Fayetteville, to memorialize victims of racial violence in the county—and become part of a growing network of community markers across the South inspired and supported by the Equal Justice Initiative which operates a museum and memorial site in Montgomery, Alabama.

In addition to the memorial marker, the project is dedicated to ongoing education and creating spaces and opportunities for community reflection. Learn more about the story of Aaron, Anthony and Randall and the mission of the project below.

Learn More
Early Plat Map of Fayetteville
Early Plat Map of Fayetteville

Washington County Community Remembrance Project

The Washington County Community Remembrance Project is a program of the Northwest Arkansas African American Heritage Association working in alignment with the principles and guidelines of the Equal Justice Initiative. The project is about involving the African American community and others in establishing a memorial marker for Aaron, Anthony and Randall—three historic victims of racial terror in our area of Washington County.

The marker will be erected in the historic Oaks Cemetery, the first planned cemetery for Black people in Fayetteville, to memorialize victims of racial violence in the county—and become part of a growing network of community markers across the South inspired and supported by the Equal Justice Initiative which operates a museum and memorial site in Montgomery, Alabama.

In addition to the memorial marker, the project is dedicated to ongoing education and creating spaces and opportunities for community reflection. Learn more about the story of Aaron, Anthony and Randall and the mission of the project below.

Learn More
BAD Times Newspaper

BAD Times

Following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King in 1968, Black students at the University of Arkansas formed the Black Americans for Democracy and launched the BAD Times newspaper when the Traveler failed to deliver fair coverage. This fall, Charles Robinson, the interim provost and professor of history, will revisit that era by bringing Black activists — past and present — to campus to participate in his Honors College Forum BAD Times.

All on-campus and in the community are invited to view recordings of the lectures. If you are interested, please fill out and submit this interest form.

Although the course will focus on the 1960s and ’70s, Robinson will provide context by discussing the 1919 Elaine Massacre in rural Phillips County, Arkansas, possibly the bloodiest racial conflict in the history of the United States.

In addition, BAD Times will feature guest appearances by original members of the organization; other prominent African American alumni, faculty and administrators; and current student leaders. Learn more below. (Original source: University of Arkansas)

Learn More

Reflections in Black

Lastly, Reflections in Black is a weekly radio segment airing on the KUAF broadcast Ozarks at Large at noon and 7 p.m. each Wednesday, hosted by the founder of Foundations: Black History Educational Programming, Raven Cook. Reflections in Black is dedicated to exploring the legacy of Black Americans, both in the United States and around the globe, by providing resources for understanding and hope for all people.

The most recent segments highlighted Joseph Carter Corbin, the former president of the University of Arkansas board of trustees who signed the contract for University Hall, now known as Old Main, and Charlotta Bass, the first Black woman candidate nominated for vice president. Check out the entire collection of recorded episodes below.

Listen Now
Charlotta Bass
Charlotta Bass

Reflections in Black

Lastly, Reflections in Black is a weekly radio segment airing on the KUAF broadcast Ozarks at Large at noon and 7 p.m. each Wednesday, hosted by the founder of Foundations: Black History Educational Programming, Raven Cook. Reflections in Black is dedicated to exploring the legacy of Black Americans, both in the United States and around the globe, by providing resources for understanding and hope for all people.

The most recent segments highlighted Joseph Carter Corbin, the former president of the University of Arkansas board of trustees who signed the contract for University Hall, now known as Old Main, and Charlotta Bass, the first Black woman candidate nominated for vice president. Check out the entire collection of recorded episodes below.

Listen Now

Bonus: Check out this award-winning Ozarks Black History radio documentary, produced by KUAF’s Jacqueline Froelich circa 2002!

Listen Now